Auckland Zinefest : : Preview #1

On the eve of the Zinefest Market day, the biggest date in the Auckland Zinefest lineup, we showcase a collection of talks with some of the talented solo artists on offer.

 


 

Flynn Gough

Hi, my name's Flynn. I’m 24 years young. I have been experimenting with making zines for the past couple of years as an outlet for my photographs. Piecing together my own content and the content of my talented friends. I’ve been to zine fest, but this year I lose my stall virginity.

 

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Where abouts can we find you at this year's Zine Fest?

You can find me at the community table.

 

Give us a general rundown on how you would most commonly make your zines? D.I.Y or young professh styles?

Usually I’ll piece together all content on InDesign, then Steve from warehouse stationary will tell me everything I’ve done wrong with my exporting, this will happen 3 times or so before I finally get it right and then he prints them for me. AND staples! Jah bless Steve.

 

Describe a real life situation that’s inspired your creative endeavours/zine making.

For the zine I’m submitting, travelling, seeing other parts of the world and how people live are the biggest inspiration. This zine is based solely on photos I got in Berlin. The cities art, culture, diversity and youth had me so fascinated. Being photographic zines, I use the medium to try capture the essence of something and try show it in a light that is pure.

 

Which artist inspires you the most to create, and why?

He would hate it if I said his name, you'll just have to trust me he's great!

 


 

Amane Cardenas – Amane & Me

Amane & Me studies the inhabitants of the forest through clay, fabric and printed matter – a collection of monochromatic, subconscious memorabilia.

We record our field trips in a series of annual publications, resulting in a stilted, mechanical narrative interspersed.  We launch them every year at Zinefest because we think those guys are cool.

 

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Where abouts can we find you at this year's Zine Fest?

Here. There. Follow the birds to the monochromatic table next to what’s possibly a much more colourful neighbour. You might spot ‘Me’.

 

Where do you source your inspiration for your zines and other creative endeavours?

The trees; the ocean; them. The limbic system. The chance to disappear completely. We go to these places to investigate, study, or commune with nature.  To remember we’re still here.

 

You seem to use a lot of re-occurring creatures in your work, do you have a particular favourite and why?

There isn’t a specific specie we follow, most of them just seem to look alike. We do keep entries on any creature we have seen, perhaps so we can predict when/where we can we find it again. Whether we go to the tip of the island or deep into our sedentary spirit, we are lucky enough to find biological novelty no matter what.

 

What themes do you most often pursue in your zines?

Through our field journals we explain meticulously the biological functions or interactions of the species we find, so we can cope appropriately with what happens in our own world.

The first journal is Caliology, which tackles the intricate systems of housing. This year’s release is Ornithology (Vol, 1), subject–specific on form, anatomy, migration and flight.

Our studies encompass substantial behavioural observations, systematic collections, factual records and unintelligible verses resonating in the distance at the time of entering data. What we see on a field trip, whether a day’s dream or a full year’s rise, is only a tiny part of what exists around us.

 


 

Ezra Whitaker-Powley

Ezra is an Auckland Based zinemaker and designer. By day he works as in-house graphic designer for placemaking powerhouse Fresh Concept. By night he freelances under the guise of his one-man studio, Easterly. When he’s not doing either of these things, one might find him running a shared studio space: final_final and zine distribution platform: Dryden Street Distro with his colleagues. 2016 will mark Ezra’s fourth year as an Auckland Zinefest stallholder.

 

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Where abouts can we find you at this year's Zine Fest?

­I will be spending the day at the Dryden Street Distro stall with my amigos, Lauren and Eden. We run the distro which sells locally produced zines at events throughout NZ and internationally through the world wide web on behalf of the zinemakers.

 

You were the original founder of the AUT Zine Club. How has that initial experience affected the way in which you make zines today, inside or outside of an institution?

I think that being around so many different processes through the AUT Zine Club really inspired me to try out new methods, and experiment with the medium quite a lot. Just having a group of people that you could discuss ideas with on a regular basis also led to quite a prolific amount of concept generation, which was great.

 

What’s the BEST and WORST feedback you have ever received from a zine you have created?

For me, silent feedback is the most telling. I believe it was Mr. Ronan Keating who said “you say it best, when you say nothing at all” and I like to think he was talking specifically about zines. The greatest feedback for me has been when someone sits down with my zine and doesn’t get up for half an hour or so. Conversely, the worst feedback I get is when someone opens a zine up and immediately puts it back down again—you know exactly what’s going through their mind and it ain’t good.

 

As a collector, how do you source/purchase zines from outside of Auckland specifically?

I have bought a few off Etsy, which are like my prized possessions (my favs seem to come from Aussie). We also tend to travel around the North Island to different zine fests and it’s guaranteed that each time we’ll come back with a back packed full of ziney gooddness.

 

Best advice for a student preparing to delegate a Zine Club?

I think we learnt that it’s better to have a small team of die-hards then a big team of people that are sort-of-interested. If we were to do it all over again I would try and organise occasional introductory meetups to get new people on board and then a more regular time for the enthusiasts to come and get stuck in together.

We’ve since left AUT so if anyone is an AUT Student interested in keeping the Zine Club flame alive then feel free to get in touch!

 


 

Z.R Southcombe

With a passion for all things creative, Zee shares her experience of the world through word and image. Boundless imagination combined with a deep desire to understand the world and our place in it make for innovative, intriguing and inspiring creations. Zee has participated in both Hamilton and Tauranga Zinefests this year, with her (wo)manpower zine series and her DIY Zine Kit.

 

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You work with children and often visit schools, how do younger creatives react to the zines you make?

Children are most interested in making zines themselves! With just a little bit of encouragement, they quickly take the zines into their own hands. It was from these encounters that my DIY Zine Kit was created.

 

Describe a real life situation that has inspired concepts for a zine of yours?

My main zine series is the (wo)manpower zine. I am surrounded by creative, strong and kind women, and I wanted a way to show the world why I admired them so much. From this, the first edition was born. It was popular with the contributors as much as my readers, so it launched into a second edition, and is now in its third.

 

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at this year’s fest?

At each zinefest I attend, I always find something I’ve never seen before, that twists the definition of ‘zine’ and thinks outside the box. I’m looking forward to seeing something that will surprise me!

 


 

Reneé Jacobi 

I'm Reneé, I'm an Illustrator sometimes and a Graphic designer other times.

My creative practice is ever changing but right now I'm focusing on gender issues, and women's rights in particular. With these deeper topics I like to try and approach them in a light-hearted manner to make conversation about them more approachable.

This is my second Auckland Zine Fest, it's such an inclusive event with amazing talent. I feel super chuffed to be a part of it.

 

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Where abouts can we find you at this year's Zine Fest?

You’ll find me at a shared stall wearing a black fanny pack with a logo on it that’s trying to be Addias.

I’ll be selling a small collection of fun things so come say Hi!

 

Are you based more within the digital land of design, or are you inclined to use a brush or pencil when it comes to making?

Kind of both. I tend to sketch out everything first so I have an idea of what it will look like. For some of my more illustrated stuff I draw everything up and then scan in, I’m a big fan of the ‘Image Trace’ button in illustrator when it comes to Zine making, haha.

I’m also way too obsessed with making GIFS, like I wish there was a cheap portable device you could sell GIFS on.

 

When and how did you become interested in zines, and how long have you been making them?

I found an old zine by Bryce Galloway; “Hot Sex with Hideous People” in a bookstore in Hamilton.

I had this contemporary art project on at uni and couldn’t think of a topic so thought I might do it on that, so I emailed him and he got me really pumped about making one.

This happened in 2011 and I have been making them ever since.

 

What kind of creative rituals or routines do you keep in place when creating your zines?

I'm not sure if they're intentional rituals but rituals all the same I guess. I have random ideas normally while walking so I jot them down in the notes section on my phone. After a lil while I would have accumulated a lot of these random thoughts so I start sketching them out, and soon enough I have enough of things with a similar theme to put into a Zine. They're normally about some kind of injustice in the world.

And then after I have all these messy ideas I wait until one week before Zine Fest to decide I should probably do something about them and BAM Zines.

I also drink a lot of bubble tea during this time - that is a definite Zine making ritual for me.

 

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