For The Maui : : Talks

You will often find that in the face of a crisis, you will turn to creativity to find a semblance of hope in an otherwise bleak scenario. Creativity is often the driving force that emotes and defines a movement; an issue is brought to light through the power of its vision, and the way in which it communicates that to the world.

 

The omnipresent threat to New Zealand’s native dolphin species, the Māui dolphins, has increased in recent months. More than one-third of the North Island’s Māui dolphin sanctuary was approved for oil-drilling in late March of this year. Now, a group of talented New Zealand artists and musicians are joining forces to help save these beautiful animals. Emma Bernard and Martin Lim have created the For The Māui project, in partnership with WWF and 121. The aim is to raise awareness, funding and support for the plight of one of New Zealand’s last surviving native sea mammals.

 

For The Māui will be releasing an exclusive mixtape featuring a range of Wellington's favourite musicians including K2K, Maxwell Young, George Turner and Ludus. Included will also be an exclusive range of prints from various New Zealand artists, all dedicated to raising awareness of for the Māui dolphins. All will be available for purchase on the 19th of August at Raglan Roast, with all proceeds going directly to WWF to support the conservation and protection of Maui dolphins and New Zealand’s precious waterways.

 

We chatted to a few of the people involved to get the breakdown:


 

EMMA

 

Tell us about yourself, whats your moniker, and your contribution to this project?

My name’s Emma, I also make music under Ludus. I make ambient electronic music from Wellington. I’ve made three tracks for the Maui mixtape; also, myself and Martin Lim from Wellington are the project managers.

 

Why did you want to be involved with this project?

I started this project with Martin because it’s fun doing something creative and doing your own work, but it’s even better and feels good to be doing something for a cause, an environmental cause as well. You really feel like you’re doing something and making a difference with the things that you produce which feels really good.

 

What's one thing everyone should do to help our marine life?

I think the first step is to be aware and educate yourself, so learn about the facts, learn what’s going on with the oceans around you. From there, you can take small steps to make a difference.

 

Why is it important for New Zealand to consider the Maui?

I think New Zealand, because it’s such a small country and it’s supposedly one of the greenest countries in the world, when there’s something like a native dolphin becoming endangered because of things that are happening in your ocean; it’s not what’ specific to the dolphins it’s things like over-netting, overfishing, treatment of the waterways. It’s about looking at one thing and thinking of the bigger picture.


 

MARTY

 

Tell us about yourself, whats your Moniker and your contribution to this project?

My name is Martin, I’m a full-time barista and manager at Raglan Roast, part-time graphic designer, part-time photographer and part-time environmentalist.

 

Why did you want to be involved with this project?

In the beginning, when the idea started, it was just a suggestion to Emma to make some music for a good cause. I think as more and more interest grew for the project from other artists, it inspired me to push this project even further because of all the interest and all the help people wanted to provide us with. Maui dolphins are one of the smallest dolphins in the world and pretty acrobatic in the water. They’re such a cute animal, and such a precious animal to New Zealand.

 

What's one thing everyone should do to help our marine life?

We should try and ban the use of single-use plastic bags for a start - just try and be cleaner in general, try to use less. Try to be sustainable in every way possible, whether that’s at home or at work or anywhere really. We’re trying to encourage people to be more sustainable.

 

Why is it important for New Zealand to consider the Maui?

Because they’re such a special animal to New Zealand, in the sense that we don’t have many mammals like the Maui dolphin in New Zealand. They’re so close to extinction, it would be sad for a country well-known for being so green and environmentally friendly to let an animal like this go extinct.


 

ZAC

 

Tell us about yourself, whats your Moniker and your contribution to this project?

I’m Zac, I’m Rifts, and I’m contributing some music - it’s electronic music that goes off on tangents.

 

Why did you want to be involved with this project?

I think it’s a really worthy cause, I think it’s a very important thing to raise awareness for. There’s only 63 Maui dolphins left, they’re a subspecies of Hector’s dolphin, which is probably a slightly more widely known endemic species. But the Maui dolphins are a critically endangered subspecies of Hector’s dolphin. A lot of their habitat has just been opened up for oil-drilling, which is pretty preposterous.

 

What's one thing everyone should do to help our marine life?

Don’t throw stuff into the water! Don’t throw stuff onto the ground, just put it in the bin. Try and recycle as much as you can; I noticed down at my local Countdown there’s a plastic bag recycling centre, which I think is really good. I think you should bundle up your plastic bags and take them there, cause they are a massive contributor to habitat damage, especially marine habitat damage, cause all of that stuff just ends up in the Pacific.

 

Why is it important for New Zealand to consider the Maui?

I think that we as New Zealanders, the land is our resource and always has been, and has been a particularly precious resource since it was just Maori people here. Continuing on now, it is a genuine economic resource for us; people come here not just because we’re a technologically powerful country, but because we’re a beautiful country. That doesn’t just include the scenery and the mountains and the trees and everything, that’s right down to every little endemic bug and native bird. We have very few native mammals, and the dolphin is certainly one of those - I think we have a duty, not only to the living creatures that make our country interesting, but an economic duty as well, because were it not for this diversity of wildlife that we have, we wouldn’t have the status in the world that we do have.


 

GEORGE

 

Tell us about yourself, whats your Moniker and your contribution to this project?

My name’s George Turner, and I’m contributing three surfy rock and roll tracks to this project.

 

Why did you want to be involved with this project?

I’ve always wanted to be engaging in political topics like this and helping the environment, but I’ve never had the knowledge in my own mind to be able to do it by myself, or the courage in a way. So it’s been really cool, and Emma’s always supportive - it’s been really exciting. And there’s only 63 Maui dolphins left, which is absolutely horrible. I’m not okay with that.

 

What's one thing everyone should do to help our marine life?

Vote Green.

 

Why is it important for New Zealand to consider the Maui?

I think the Maui in particular is a good symbolic animal that everyone rallies around, and puts money towards DOC and towards these other agencies that we have that are growing and growing every week. So it’s nice to have something like the Maui dolphin, which is so beautiful, unlike maybe some sort of insect that’s also endangered. I mean, look at how beautiful it is.


 

DALI

 

Tell us about yourself, whats your Moniker and your contribution to this project?

My name’s Dali, Dali Gayle, and my moniker is FCKCPS. I am contributing two slightly more rhythmic electronic songs and one ambient song to the mix.

 

Why did you want to be involved with this project?

It seemed like something wroth getting involved with, it seemed like a good cause, had some good people. Gives a bit of purpose (laughs). The Maui dolphins are so beautiful - I just read that the females can grow up to 1.7 metres, which is not that big is it? It’s not that big. That’s my fun fact.

 

What's one thing everyone should do to help our marine life?

Pay more attention; pick up that bit of rubbish, tell your kids not to litter. The world’s ending, so look after it.

 

Why is it important for New Zealand to consider the Maui?

Is it native? It is native! And there’s fuck-all of them. Do the math; we need them.


 

HARRI

note: I didn't interview myself here, transcribed by myself, this interview was taken by our friend Emma Bernard (who you met earlier, see above).

 

Tell us about yourself, whats your Moniker and your contribution to this project?

My name is Harri, or Harriet - I am working on more of the behind-the-scenes stuff for the For The Maui Project, and I am 21 and from Wellington.

 

Why did you want to be involved with this project?

I love having a humanitarian focus in a project that I’m working on. It’s really nice to be able to appeal to both my humanitarian and my creative sides and make a difference within the creative spectrum. It’s really nice to see a cross-combination of the creative arts, such a trendy fast-moving industry, with a more environmental focus which can be quite a stagnant idea. It’s nice to see this idea coming more into the forefront, with both creative and environmental focuses in mind. There are 63 Maui dolphins left; I just learned from Dali that the Hectors dolphin females are 1.7 metres. They are native, they are a sub-species of Hectors dolphin and they are critically endangered.

 

What's one thing everyone should do to help our marine life?

In general just don’t be a dick to the environment. Don’t litter, don’t use those micro-beads that you get in face-washes, that’s just common sense. There’s so much that we could do that we don’t do, like throwing your cigarette butts into an actual bin - doing the smallest things possible. We claim we’re such an environmentally minded culture, yet we don’t embrace our environment in the same way that some other countries do. I know a few people who do beach cleanups every once in a while, and so much of the rubbish they find around Wellington’s shores is easily recyclable. It could be easily taken care of, but we don’t, because we’re lazy and it’s not good.

 

Why is it important for New Zealand to consider the Maui?

I think New Zealand doesn’t necessarily practice what we preach when it comes to our environmental impact. We do often present ourselves as 100% clean green pure New Zealand (I’m pretty sure that’s the actual slogan), and yet we don’t follow through with any of these things in policy or otherwise. Our environmental policy is quite outdated comparatively, so I think we definitely need to make that more of a focus especially given the up-coming elections. If we are going to use the environment as one of our main sources of tourism, and we are going to use that as a marketing tool for our country, we have to make sure we actually have the grounds to back it up - otherwise we’re killing off our animals as we use them for tourism.


 

For The Maui at Raglan Roast will be from 2pm - 7pm 19th of August, at:

Raglan Roast

40b Able Smith Street, Wellington

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/102713027103100/

 

Money Laundering For The Maui will be 10pm - late, 19th of August, at:

Laundry Bar

242 Cuba Street, Wellington

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/335596920210367/

 

For The Maui:

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/forthemaui/

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/forthemaui/

 

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